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Fully feathered head by Dinosaurzzz Fully feathered head by Dinosaurzzz
I was reading through Duane Nash's blogposts on dromaeosaurids. In the third post, he brought up a really good point. He said that the idea of dromaeosaurids having an edge of feathers on the head, with the snout being completely featherless and the rest of the head covered in feathers, is a really overused idea with no evidence to support it. Nash said that there isn't any reason for the feathers not to cover the whole head, like mammals.

While I don't think the idea of some dromaeosaurids having featherless snouts is impossible (I believe plenty of them did), it is a really overused idea. Like, really. It's basically all you see in dromaeosaurid drawings. While my drawings Zhenyuanlong have a fully feathered head, I wanted to draw a picture that illustrated this idea more clearly. The dinosaur is a generic dromaeosaurid, no specific species.

The blogpost, if you're curious. He only briefly mentions it though, but the rest is an interesting read:
antediluviansalad.blogspot.no/…

UPDATE: :iconvalia2305: debunked this restoration, see her comment below.
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:iconvalia2305:
Valia2305 Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2017  Hobbyist Artist
Actually, we do have evidence of part-fuzzy snouts, but not fully feathered. That'd be technically impossible and it would be a great disadvantage for the animal itself. Great painting anyway! ^^
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:icondinosaurzzz:
Dinosaurzzz Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2017
We do? Can you tell me? But how would it be impossible and a disadvantage?

Thank you, it's actually a drawing colored with pencils.
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:iconvalia2305:
Valia2305 Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2017  Hobbyist Artist
Mammals have fuzzy snouts because they can flex their lips, unlike reptiles or birds. Their lips need to be hard. But, you'd say, fuzz can be ON the hard snout. Nope. Certainly, fuzz needs soft skin in order to exist, so, the snout would be soft and the animal's bite and protection would become greatly reduced, while a mammal's snout is soft, so that it will be flexible.
So, for reptiles, this is basically a disadvantage because
1) Less protection (mammals don't have protection either, i'm not saying they do)
2) The bite force would be greatly reduced
3) Their upper teeth would pierce into the lower lips sometimes, because they would not be hard enough and they would be unstable (out of place)
4) because birds don't have this trait as well, nor do other reptiles.
Welp, i hope this helped!
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:icontrilobitecannibal:
TrilobiteCannibal Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
reptile lips (and the rest of the head) are soft though, more elastic than rigid (with the exception of crocs) as far as I can tell
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:iconvalia2305:
Valia2305 Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2017  Hobbyist Artist
Their scales are relatively soft.
It's highly unlikely that dinosaur snouts were scaly though, a) because we have no evidence and b) because evidence points towards hard and fleshy lips,
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:icontrilobitecannibal:
TrilobiteCannibal Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I'm not saying their snouts were scaled, just that the flesh might have been softer and more elastic like the snouts of other reptiles (ignoring the integument)
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:icondinosaurzzz:
Dinosaurzzz Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2017
Oh, ok. Makes sense. Thanks for answering!
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:iconvalia2305:
Valia2305 Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2017  Hobbyist Artist
Always :)
There is however a case where the snout can be covered in long bristles that only branch from the middle of the snout or until far, but leaving the beak exposed:
www.hbw.com/sites/default/file…
people.eku.edu/ritchisong/554i…
These are possible on dinos as well
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:icondinosaurzzz:
Dinosaurzzz Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2017
I'm pretty sure there are birds with feathered snouts (seagulls for example).
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:iconvalia2305:
Valia2305 Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2017  Hobbyist Artist
Nope. Take a better look
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:icondinosaurzzz:
Dinosaurzzz Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2017
It still looks like the feathers go all the way to the beak.
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(1 Reply)
:iconmrplcole:
mrplcole Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2017
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:icondinosaurzzz:
Dinosaurzzz Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2017
But you agree that a fully feathered head isn't that radical?
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:iconmrplcole:
mrplcole Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2017
IDK, I guess, the only reason a bird's snout can't have anything covering it is because of it's beak, but idk
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Makes sense, if you look really closely to the Zhenyuanlong fossil you can see the fluff extends pretty far along the jaw.
Good job.
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:icondinosaurzzz:
Dinosaurzzz Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2017
Really? I don't personally see it though :/

Thank you!
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Not all the way to the tip, but far enough (well, as far as I can see on the pic, I don't wanna become a sort of Dave peters XD)
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:icondinosaurzzz:
Dinosaurzzz Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2017
Using photoshop, I've concluded that Zhenyuanlong is actually a sauropod.
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:iconrizkiusmaulanae:
RizkiusMaulanae Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2017  Student Traditional Artist
Zhenyuanlong is a sauropod confirmed

Conspiracy ?
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:icondinosaurzzz:
Dinosaurzzz Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2017
:illuminati: 
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well, I've concluded that it had a fishing bob on it's forehead and a sail on it's back.
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:icondinosaurzzz:
Dinosaurzzz Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2017
Preach!
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